Mary CASSATT


Mary CASSATT, Self-portrait.

Mary CASSATT (1844 –1926) was an American painter and printmaker. She was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, but lived much of her adult life in France. She was called as one of the three great ladies ("les trois grandes dames") of Impressionism alongside Marie Bracquemond and Berthe Morisot.

Cassatt's reputation is based on an extensive series of rigorously drawn and tenderly observed paintings and prints on the theme of the mother and child. Some of these works depict her own relatives, friends, or clients, although in her later years she generally used professional models in compositions that are often reminiscent of Italian Renaissance depictions of the Madonna and Child.

In recognition of her contributions to the arts, France awarded Mary Cassat the Légion d'honneur in 1904. She also served as an advisor to several major art collectors and stipulated that they eventually donate their purchases to American art museums. After 1914 Mary was forced to stop painting as she became almost blind. Cassatt died on June 14, 1926 at Château de Beaufresne, near Paris, and was buried in the family vault at Le Mesnil-Théribus, France.




Mary CASSATT, Self-portrait.

Mary CASSATT (1844 –1926) was an American painter and printmaker. She was born in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania, but lived much of her adult life in France. She was called as one of the three great ladies ("les trois grandes dames") of Impressionism alongside Marie Bracquemond and Berthe Morisot.

Cassatt's reputation is based on an extensive series of rigorously drawn and tenderly observed paintings and prints on the theme of the mother and child. Some of these works depict her own relatives, friends, or clients, although in her later years she generally used professional models in compositions that are often reminiscent of Italian Renaissance depictions of the Madonna and Child.

In recognition of her contributions to the arts, France awarded Mary Cassat the Légion d'honneur in 1904. She also served as an advisor to several major art collectors and stipulated that they eventually donate their purchases to American art museums. After 1914 Mary was forced to stop painting as she became almost blind. Cassatt died on June 14, 1926 at Château de Beaufresne, near Paris, and was buried in the family vault at Le Mesnil-Théribus, France.