ALTERED ART


If you can't decide between modern flair and classic, why not both? 

Take a look at the collection of altered art created by our graphic designers. It features a variety of fashion ideas. It gives old art pieces an air of mystery and draws the viewer in to take another look at the crackled vintage painting they might otherwise just pass by. And it's fun. Such prints play nicely in modern and eclectic interiors.

The term “altered art” conjures up different visions and ideas for every individual. Altered art is something that has changed from the original concept, creating something new and different. This form of creative expression is not new, and actually has a history stretching back over many centuries. The practice of altering existing works of art goes all the way back to the Middle Ages when the monks would conserve their precious stocks of parchment by reusing old manuscripts, often incompletely obscuring what was there before. Leonardo da Vinci painted over his earlier and less important works, again sometimes leaving portions of the original image still visible. Using this technique worked Pablo Picasso and Kurt Schwitters. In the 1960s some other well-known names were Robert Rauschenberg and Andy Warhol.




If you can't decide between modern flair and classic, why not both? 

Take a look at the collection of altered art created by our graphic designers. It features a variety of fashion ideas. It gives old art pieces an air of mystery and draws the viewer in to take another look at the crackled vintage painting they might otherwise just pass by. And it's fun. Such prints play nicely in modern and eclectic interiors.

The term “altered art” conjures up different visions and ideas for every individual. Altered art is something that has changed from the original concept, creating something new and different. This form of creative expression is not new, and actually has a history stretching back over many centuries. The practice of altering existing works of art goes all the way back to the Middle Ages when the monks would conserve their precious stocks of parchment by reusing old manuscripts, often incompletely obscuring what was there before. Leonardo da Vinci painted over his earlier and less important works, again sometimes leaving portions of the original image still visible. Using this technique worked Pablo Picasso and Kurt Schwitters. In the 1960s some other well-known names were Robert Rauschenberg and Andy Warhol.



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